Employees’ Entitlement to Monopolistic Rents

The Japanese Supreme Court rejected a plea from “contract employees” (term limited employees) for retirement benefits, which are provided to full time employees, alleging that the denial of the benefits would be against the Labor Contract Law which prohibits discrimination between the employees. The opinion of the Court is that employers are accorded certain ‘reasonable” flexibility in structuring employment in the company as provided for in the Japanese labor legislation.

The argument sounds flawless, except that the type of the business the employer is engaged in: subway platform shops selling newspapers, drinks and other minor items to passengers walking the platform. Clearly, these outlets are catering to captive consumers who use the subway, or an accredited monopoly. In this scenario, monopolistic rents would accrue to the sales businesses which take advantage of the captivity or lack of alternative supplies. Indeed, the employer has accepted retired subway workers in exchange for the long term concession. Then the employment issue here is more a question of how to allocate the monopolistic rents than that of efficiency, as refusal to pay retirement benefits to contract employees will not likely benefit captive consumers.

最高裁は契約社員に対して退職手当を支給しないことが正社員と比較して労働契約法違反の差別にあたる、という請求を退けた。その理由とは、雇用主には会社の雇用関係について合理的な柔軟性が認められるから、というものである。一見もっともであるが、このケースでの雇用主とは、地下鉄プラットフォーム等の構内店舗で利用客に新聞、ドリンク等を経営する事業体であることを見逃してはならない。言うまでもなく、これらの店舗の顧客とは地下鉄利用客という、認められた独占事業によりいわば人質にとられている。そして人質状態、あるいは他に選択肢のない利用客を利用する販売事業には独占的な利潤が生じるだろう。だから雇用主は長期的な構内販売権の見返りに、引退した近田哲職員を正社員として雇用してきた。そうしてみると、この事件の争点とは経営の効率性というより、独占的な利潤をどのように配分するかという問題であることになる。退職手当を契約社員に支給しないからと言って顧客の利益にはなりそうもない。